HenryGrowFamily
genealogy of the grow family
First Name:  Last Name: 
[Advanced Search]  [Surnames]

Histories

» Show All     «Prev «1 ... 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 ... 211» Next»     » Slide Show

Autobiography of Elaine Grow Fuller Putnam



Autobiography of Elaine Grow Fuller Putnam

I was born in Huntsville, Utah, November 16, 1909, the first child of Arthur and Ella Grow. I had two brothers, Eldon and Max and a sister, Afton. Living on a farm we were associated with animals and pets, pigeons, rabbits, pet lambs, pigs, cats and dogs. We always had chores to do, gathering eggs, feeding and watering chickens; also feeding new born calves. To teach them to drink from a bucket we put our hand down in the milk and let the calves suck on our fingers. Their teeth were sharp and it rubbed the skin off of our fingers. We always had little pigs. One little pig became a pet. He would sit beside the cow when we were milking and open his mouth to have us squirt milk into it. I was not so smart as Afton. She would pinch the cows teat so that it would move. Then she would say, "This cow won't stand still." She made such a fuss Dad would say, "Get to the house and help your Ma." She never had to milk cows. I just pulled on up till the time I was married. I used to look at the shadow of my long eyelashes as they shown on the cow. We would walk over a mile to the store with an egg in our hands, never money, to buy candy. Sometimes we would find a nest under the hay in the barn with eight or nine eggs in it. Then we could get an extra one. We had some red pullets (young hens) one year. They were quite plump. We would dress them in our doll dresses. They stood it quite well. We had few toys and had to make believe that a bushel box was an automobile, table, doll bed or meat counter. We would cut rhubarb into pieces for wieners, use the leaves for round steak, wrap it up in newspaper and pay for it with make-believe money. I spent a lot of time at Aunt Kate's place. Fern and Vilate and I would get Pete and Eldon and we would sit on the ditch bank and practice our "Pooper Band." We used dandelion stems and the leaf of a weed that when folded over made a musical sound. When we had worked up a good tune we would gather a green vine which grew in the raspberry patch and drape our heads and shoulders, then march around the block. I learned to drive our new Model T Ford when I was 12 years old. Mom tried to learn but she almost mowed down the fence one day so would never try again. I am quite proud of my driving as in sixty years I never scratched or dented a car and never had a citation. I made fourteen trips to California and drove all the way as it was easier for me to drive than to tell Put how to do it. I always worked on the farm. I drove the team or the haymower, hay rake and also unloaded hay with the Jackson Fork which was a fork on the end of a pulley. It swung on a derrick. One day a snake had come up on the load and I screamed and let go of the rake. The fork swung around and almost hit Pa. I didn't use the fork much after that. Saturday was bath night. Mom would heat water on the stove in a wash boiler. Beginning with the smallest kid he was put in a wash tub on the floor where his head was scrubbed and rinsed. Then came the next in line, a bit more water added. By the time for my turn there was near half a tub full. During the week we would bathe and swim in the summer, sponge bath during the week in winter. We used an outdoor cranny which was quite some distance from the house. We used a Sears-Roebuck catalogue for tissue. Things went well till someone forgot to close the door and the snow blew in and iced up the seat. One time I was rocking it back and forth while Eldon was in it. He was afraid it was going to tip over and he was really screaming. Dad was far down in the field and he thought the bull had him down. He ran up to the yard and when he saw what was happening he swatted me with a gunny sack which was hanging on the gate. Really stung. My cousin Edna and I used to tease Granny Grow. We turned all of her pictures backward. She had one of her brother's who looked like a cabbage head with his round bald head and mustache. She would get real upset when we called him that. She liked Eldon better than me and we would ask her for some bread and jam. She would spread his all over with jam and give me a little dab in the center of mine. I didn't like to do dishes but Mom let me rollerskate in the kitchen while I did them. She taught me how to mix bread and one day I made a rhubarb pie for Dad. I knew much mixing made good bread so I mixed the pie crust accordingly. Don't know if Dad ate it but he was pleased. When I was six years old I had to finish first grade in Ogden. Mom and Dad moved back to Huntsville and I stayed with my Thurston Grandparents. I would go home Friday night and back Monday morning. I would bring a gallon jug of milk down on the street car. Seemed there was always a trickle of milk running out of the jug. The conductor called me his "little milk girl." I loved my Thurston Grandparents very much. Grandpa would sit for a long time with me on his lap. I would part his whiskers and make two braids, then comb it again and start over. I was baptized in November in Spring Creek. It was a mile from our home. They cracked the ice off to make a hole. We were hurriedly submerged, then climbed in the buggy and rode home. I was freezing but happy. I became acquainted with the Eden boys when we were fifteen. They would come over in an old Model T and wait by the church gate till we came out. It was really romantic. We'd drive around and sometimes stop in the ice cream parlor for a soda. It usually fell my lot to sit on Ott (Otis Leland) Fuller's lap. He would squeeze me so tight I could hardly breath. I went with him to dances which were held on Saturday nights and as he was a good dancer, we won a few prizes. When I was seventeen we decided to elope and keep it a secret. We were married 30 July 1927. He borrowed five dollars to buy a ring. We went to Farmington which seemed a long ways away. We had to buy a pot roast for Chloe's Sunday dinner and had a flat tire on the way home. We bought a hamburger and root beer and called it our wedding. I hid my ring and was going to tell all about it in a year, but the following day the license came out in the newspaper. My aunt called Ma and told her about it so… Ott was working on the farm and we decided to buy a barber shop and some furniture. He went to Salt Lake Barber College. I worked for a widow with two boys. Saw my first bedbug. Boy, did they have them. We lived on grapes and fried potatoes while in Salt Lake. Couldn't seem to find much to cook. Had to learn the hard way. We rented for the first year and decided to buy a house. Paid $1800 for it. The depression came and no one had money for hair-cuts so we fell behind in our bank payments. The bank was going to foreclose on us so I sent a letter to President Roosevelt telling him the situation. The Federal Land Bank gave us a long-term loan and we were able to keep our home. Bought a car from Dad for $35 and it took us years to pay that. We were never hungry like many people during the depression. We had a cow which Dad had given us, a small milk check and butter; canned fruit, eggs and chickens. We grew carrots and potatoes. Ott went hunting and got a deer. I roasted and bottled the meat, made soup by basting the bones and adding onions and carrots to it. We never had canned soup. We moved to Ogden and back to Huntsville every year when Ott started work at the LyVerl Barber Shop on Washington Blvd. In Ogden. I moved 35 times in my life. We finally sold our home in Huntsville and bought one in Ogden. Painted it up and sold it at a profit. We bought a large lot with a large barn on it, tore it down and used the lumber to build a lovely brick home. We kept a part of the lot and sold the house with a duplex for a trade. Built a house on our lot and lived there for a few years. Ott had a heart attack and I sold the house to Sharon and moved into the duplex, then sold it and bought a place at Grand View. I met Put (Glen Putnam), married him, sold my place and moved into his home. I had known him all my life as he used to come up to see Ruby at Aunt Kates's. (He later married Ruby). I was blessed with one son and two daughters, Kay, Audrey and Sharon. Also my grand and great-grand children have given me much joy and pride. I have been blessed by having them. Now that I am retired and doing nothing I have many memories. I worked at two floral shops, a pie shop, a bakery counter, was a checker and a guard at the General Depot during the war. During the depression I cooked soup for the school lunch. I would make a large five gallon pot of soup and the janitor would come to my home which was a block away and pull it to the school on a hand sleigh. It was three cents a cup. Times have really changed and it is difficult to realize the high cost of things. But as I grow older I just try to drift along and take things as they come. I feel that I have the love of my family and I thank the Good Lord that I have been so blessed. Hope to live a few years longer and enjoy them. Dictated June 1983 Nane. as we affectionately call our mother, is a very generous, warm-hearted lady, Throughout her lifetime she has helped many people but in her modest way makes light of the great service she has given. She concerns herself with other's problems and even worries about the neighbor dogs if she feels they are mistreated. She has always been a good example to us, especially as a model of industry and honesty. We also love her sense of humor. Recently her sight has become impaired and she finds it difficult being unable to do the things she has always done. A busy person from sunrise to bedtime she's now very frustrated adjusting to this challenge. She will handle it. though, as she has always done as trials have come into her life. Audrey (Mickey) Fuller Robertson Post Script In the last years of her life Nane lost much of her vision. Parkinson's Disease and osteoporosis further impaired her physically, making her life most difficult: Through these trials she maintained her sense of humor and continued to worry about the welfare of others. Put kindly cared for her with help from the family. After her second spinal fracture it was necessary to move her to a medical extended-care facility where she endured two and a half months of pain and disability. On our last visit together she tried to tell me something. I thought she was telling me she wanted to go home and I told her how much I wished I could take her home with me. She had a fever that day and as I drove back to Murray the Spirit whispered this was the answer to our prayers that she might be released from her pain and suffering. That night I had the same feeling which came each time our daughter, Lori, went to the hospital to deliver a new little grandchild. It seemed I was waiting for Nane to be born into Paradise. The next morning the nurse called to tell me Nane's condition was worse and they planned to take her to the hospital for x-rays. As I prepared to drive to Ogden Kay called to tell me she had died. While Kay, Sharon and I met to plan her funeral we had a great feeling of peace. Leon later told us as he sat in the next room he saw a group of people gathered together, including Dad and Nane. She was, as usual, concerned about things being done properly. Dad put his arm around her and told her everything would be alright. Leon was amazed how calmly she accepted that. All went well with the funeral and we felt she was pleased. My friend, Dick Myers the mortician, remarked to me what a beautiful woman our mother was. She died Wednesday. 19 July 1989, at 9:05 am and was buried Saturday 22 July 1989, beside Dad and Lisa, Sharon's daughter, in the Huntsville Cemetery.


Owner/Sourcewww.familysearch.com
Linked toElaine Grow

» Show All     «Prev «1 ... 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 ... 211» Next»     » Slide Show